A200 Test: Everything you need to know.

Most adverse food reactions are due to food intolerance, which is the body’s response to eating certain foods. The body has difficulty or is unable to absorb some nutrients, resulting in extreme discomfort, which may be associated with a wide variety of symptoms. The prevalence of food intolerance  in the general population is believed to be 5-20%, but the true prevalence remains unknown due to insufficient or underdiagnosed data.

IgG-mediated food intolerance (type III hypersensitivity reaction) is a delayed immune reaction, which is associated with several nonspecific symptoms including skin rashes, hives, asthma, abdominal cramps, diarrhea, constipation and even neurological manifestations such as migraines.

Understand how to diagnose Food Intolerance

There are different factors that can alter intestinal permeability or the functionality of the immune system (such as stress, infections, antibiotics or excessive use of anti-inflammatory drugs), resulting in an increased likelihood of presenting food intolerance reactions. IgG-mediated food intolerance can be caused by increased intestinal permeability, thus allowing food substances to access the circulation like antigens, leading to the production of specific IgG for food proteins.

Even though food intolerance is so common in the population, its diagnosis is generally not straightforward and requires an understanding of the most varied clinical aspects , including the severity and timing of the onset of symptoms. Due to nonspecific symptomology, the fact that it cannot be detected in dermal tests and not having a quick cause-effect response, food intolerances are even more difficult to be detected. This is further complicated by the various food intolerance mechanisms that may exist, ranging from pharmacological (e.g., substances that alter the metabolism) to enzyme deficiencies (e.g., lactose absorption) and non-specific gastrointestinal functioning.

However, with scientific advances, innovation tests that allow the analysis of the main foods that can trigger this type of immune response are increasingly accessible in people’s lives. The identification of the intolerance profile using tests that evaluate the main foods related to this type of reaction from a simple serum sample has ensured better targeting in the clinical conduct, thus providing greater benefits in the patient’s life.

Understand about Synlab A200 Test

Faced with this scenario, the SYNLAB Group developed the A200 test that assesses the immune system’s response to over 200. With a simple blood draw, it is possible to know which foods can be potentially harmful to your health. As such, eliminating these foods that cause intolerance provides a notable improvement in the quality of life in a high percentage of patients.

The A200 test consists of the determination of IgG antibodies in the serum against 216 food proteins, such as:

  • Vegetables and greens: Pumpkin, Zucchini, Chard, Celery, Artichoke, Lettuce, Leek, Asparagus, Potato, Sweet potato, Eggplant, Beet, Broccoli, Mache greens, Onion, Carrot, Champignon mushroom, Mushroom, Kale, Brussels sprouts, Cauliflower, Shallot, Endive, Spinach, Turnip, Cucumber, Green Pepper, Radish, Cabbage, Red Cabbage, Arugula, Tomato and Green Beans.
  • Legumes: Chickpeas, Peas, Favo beans, White beans, Red beans, Lentils and Soybeans/Soy oil.
  • Dairy products and eggs: Beta-lactoglobulin, Casein, Egg white, Milk/buffalo cheese, Milk/goat cheese, Milk/sheep cheese, Milk/cow cheese and Egg yolk.
  • Fish and shellfish: Clam, Anchovy, Herring, Tuna, Cod, Red Sea Bream, Jumbo Shrimp/Shrimp, Escargot, Crab, Carp, Mackerel, Caviar, Dorado, Eel, Lobster, Sole, Razor clam, Pike, Squid, Hake, Grouper, Mussel, Oyster, Swordfish, Flounder, Goose Barnacle, Octopus, Sea Bass, Brill, Salmon, Sardines, Cuttlefish, Monkfish, trout, Scallop and Vongole Clam.
  • Meat: Ostrich, Goat, Horse, Venison, Quail, Rabbit, Lamb, Chicken, Duck, Partridge, Turkey, Pork and Veal meats.
  • Fruit: Avocado, Pineapple, Carob, Plum, Blackberry, Cranberry, Olive/Olive oil, Banana, Cherry, Coconut, Apricot, Fig, Raspberry, Black Currant, Red Currant, Kiwi, Orange, Lychee, Lime, Lemon, Apple, Mango, Watermelon, Melon, Blueberry, Strawberry, Nectarine, Papaya, Pear, Peach, Pomegranate, Date, Tangerine, Grapefruit and White Grape/Black Grape.
  • Dry nuts: Almond, Cashew, Hazelnut, Peanut, Sweet Chestnut, Walnut, Brazil Nut, Macadamia, Raisin, Pine Nut and Pistachio.
  • Herbs and spices: Saffron, Licorice, Caper, Rosemary, Garlic, Anise, Thistle oil, Vanilla, Chamomile, Canola oil, Black tea, Green tea, Coriander, Cumin, Clove, Curry, Dill, Fennel, Tarragon, Grape leaf, Ginger, Goji berries Peppermint/Spearmint, Laurel, Marjoram, Basil, Mustard, Nutmeg, Oregano, White/black pepper, Red pepper, Paprika, Parsley, Salvia, Hemp seed, Chia seed, Poppy seed and Thyme.
  • Cereals and grains: Barley (Hordeum vulgare), Rice, Oats (Avena sativa), Cocoa, Sugarcane, Couscous, Rye (Secale cereale), Hulled wheat (Triticum spelta), Gluten, Flax seed (Linum usitatissimum), Corn (Zea mays), Malt, Millet (Panicum niliaceum), Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa), Wheat bran, Sunflower/Sunflower oil, Sesame seed (Sesamum indicum), Durum wheat semolina (Triticum durum), Cassava/tapioca (Manihot esculenta), Wheat (Triticum aestivum), Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) and Amaranth (Amarantus).
  • Others: Agar-agar, Spaghetti seaweed, Spirulina seaweed, Aloe vera, Coffee, Cinnamon, Brewer’s yeast, Bread yeast, Hops, Honey, Cola/Cola nut and Rhubarb.
Indications for the A200 Test.

As such, the A200 test is an important option to be considered in the event of any adverse clinical manifestations without diagnosis, such as:

  • Gastrointestinal disorders: abdominal pain, constipation, diarrhea, abdominal swelling, nausea, acidity, ulcers and thrush, gastritis, colitis.
  • Dermatological processes: acne, eczema, psoriasis, itching, hives.
  • Neurological diseases: headache, migraine, dizziness, vertigo.
  • Respiratory changes: cough, bronchitis, asthma, rhinitis.
  • Psychological conditions: anxiety, depression, fatigue, hyperactivity.
  • Musculoskeletal disorders: pain, stiffness, arthritis, fibromyalgia.
  • Other: fluid retention and obesity.
A200 Test – Highly sensitive technique

Through a simple blood draw, the A200 exam performs IgG analysis using the Immunoblotting methodology, a highly sensitive technique capable of detecting low levels of IgG. SYNLAB collaborated with a major biotechnology company in the development and application for the analysis of food hypersensitivity, which allowed us to analyze more than 200 foods.. All foods are evaluated in duplicate, which also guarantees high reliability. The results obtained allow food intolerance to be categorized into 4 classes:

  • Allowed foods: foods that have no reactivity and that can be consumed in the usual way.
  • Foods not recommended: foods that have low reactivity, i.e., they may show symptoms if consumed in excess and/or habitually. For these cases, a rotating diet and chewing food thoroughly is recommended to promote a mechanical breakdown of proteins.
  • Foods to avoid: foods that show moderate reactivity. These foods are highly likely to result in symptoms if consumed in excess and/or habitually.
  • Prohibited foods: foods that have high reactivity. They are highly likely to result in symptoms if consumed in excess and/or habitually.

For foods that show moderate or high reactivity on the A200 exam, it is recommended to exclude them from the diet for an extended period (at least three months, ideally six months). The elimination of hypersensitive foods from the diet (abnormal IgG levels) provides a visible improvement in approximately 75% of cases. Food can be gradually introduced back into the diet after at least three months.

It is important to emphasize that the result of the A200 exam must be evaluated by the requesting physician, within the patient’s clinical context, thus guaranteeing recommendations and an appropriate and individualized diet plan.

The purpose of the A200 exam is to analyze IgG-mediated food intolerance. However, other types of food intolerances caused by genetic changes or enzyme deficiencies cannot be detected by the A200 test. The same goes for food allergies that are mediated by IgE. Thus, the result of the A200 test does not exclude the possibility that the individual may be allergic to the studied foods.

Frequently asked questions about the A200 Test

Why conduct the A200 test?

Food intolerance is a delayed immune reaction, IgG-mediated, which is associated with several nonspecific symptoms including skin rashes, hives, asthma, abdominal cramps, diarrhea, constipation and even neurological manifestations such as migraines.  Identifying foods that can lead to these symptoms allows the requesting physician to establish an appropriate diet plan for the patient.

What is the purpose of the A200 test?

The A200 exam identifies the IgG reactivity (food intolerance) to the proteins of 216 foods. These results assist the requesting physician in establishing a meal plan for the patient, thus improving the patient’s quality of life.

What is the A200 test?

The A200 test, through a blood draw, consists of an IgG analysis using the Immunoblotting methodology, a highly sensitive technique capable of analyzing food intolerance for 216 food proteins.

Who is the A200 test indicated for?

  •     gastrointestinal disorders: abdominal pain, constipation, diarrhea, abdominal swelling, nausea, acidity, ulcers and thrush, gastritis, colitis.
  •     Dermatological processes: acne, eczema, psoriasis, itching, hives.
  •     Neurological diseases: headache, migraine, dizziness, vertigo.
  •     Respiratory changes: cough, bronchitis, asthma, rhinitis.
  •     Psychological conditions: anxiety, depression, fatigue, hyperactivity.
  •     Musculoskeletal disorders: pain, stiffness, arthritis, fibromyalgia.
  •     Other: fluid retention and obesity.

What are the differentials of the A200 test. Is there any extra information?

The A200 exam analyzes IgG reactivity to the protein of 216 foods. The results obtained allow food intolerance to be categorized into 4 classes:

  • Allowed foods: can be consumed in the usual way.
  • Foods to avoid: foods that are highly likely to result in symptoms if consumed in excess and/or habitually.
  • Foods not recommended: A rotating diet and chewing food thoroughly is recommended to promote a mechanical breakdown of proteins.
  • Prohibited foods: It is recommended to exclude them from the diet for an extended period (at least three months, ideally six months).

What are the technologies and advantages of the A200 test methodology?

The A200 exam is conducted using Immunoblotting, a highly sensitive technique where it has the ability to detect low levels of IgG. The analyses are conducted in duplicate, ensuring greater reliability of the results.

Which doctor orders the A200 test?

The A200 exam must be ordered by a specialist within the patient’s clinical context.

What is the delivery time for the A200 test?

The A200 test has a delivery time of 15 business days, counting from the receipt of the sample by the operating sector.

What type of sample is requested in the A200 test?

The A200 test is performed with a simple serum draw (at least 1 mL).

Does the A200 test identify lactose intolerance?

No, the A200 etest analyzes intolerance to proteins of certain foods and it is possible to detect milk intolerance. Butlactose intolerance can also be caused by enzyme deficiency or by genetic causes, so its detection is not possible.

Does the A200 test detect gluten intolerance?

The A200 test analyzes IgG-mediated food intolerance to gluten. However, celiac disease has the genetic factor, mostly due to the HLA DQ2 and DQ8 histocompatibility antigen.

Does the A200 test identify food allergies?

No, the A200 test analyzes IgG-mediated food intolerance against 216 food proteins . Food allergy reactions are mediated by IgE. Therefore, the result of the A200 test does not exclude the possibility of food allergies.

What is food allergy and how does it differ from food intolerance?

Food allergy is a hypersensitivity that we develop to some foods, which is mediated by class E immunoglobulins (known as IgE) that trigger immediate reactions (called type I hypersensitivity reactions) with possible involvement of the mucosa, skin, airways, intestinal tract and vascular system. Primary food allergy is based on the (early) sensitization of IgE to animal proteins (e.g., cow’s milk, chicken eggs) or vegetable proteins (e.g., peanuts, hazelnuts or wheat). In the case of secondary food allergies, the IgE against pollen proteins (e.g. birch) reacts to structurally related food proteins (with cross reactions to stone fruits, for example).

Food allergies occur when the body seeks to defend itself against the entry of certain foods, even in small quantities. By identifying them as a foreign body, the organism produces antibodies for its defense.  

Food allergies usually appear in younger patient.. Intolerances, however, can appear at any time in life, due to difficulty in digesting certain foods, becoming more frequent as we age.

What is the difference between intolerance and food allergy?

Food allergies usually appear in younger patient.. Intolerances, however, can appear at any time in life due to difficulty in digesting certain foods, becoming more frequent as we get older. This happens because digestion becomes slower, since we decrease the production of enzymes used in the metabolization of food.

With the difficulty in the absorption process of some nutrients, the body retains the substance, which is accumulated in the stomach, and this can cause discomfort such as cramps, migraines, obesity, dizziness, nausea, psoriasis, diarrhea, arrhythmia, constipation, thrush, fatigue, conjunctivitis, among others.

If an intolerance condition exists, the IgG test will show a significant alteration. Allergy, on the other hand, can be diagnosticated by analyzis of IgE test.

About the SYNLAB Group
The SYNLAB Group is a leader in providing medical diagnostic services in Europe, providing a full range of clinical laboratory analysis services to patients, healthcare professionals, clinics and the pharmaceutical industry. Resulting from the Labco and SYNLAB merger, the new SYNLAB Group is the undisputed European leader in medical laboratory services.

 

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